(Source: fokkd20s)

(Reblogged from officialdollyparton)
(Reblogged from nicocoer)

mikerugnetta:

depthoffieldmagazine:

darkarfs:

wespennest:

Delia Derbyshire

Cut ups, mash-ups, circuit bending, tape-mangling and, oh yeah, the Dr. Who theme.

recognize, clowns

One of the true innovators of electronic music. And yes, she’s the person who “realised” (arranged, performed) the Doctor Who theme.

From wikipedia: “In August 1962 she assisted composer Luciano Berio at a two-week summer school at Dartington Hall, for which she borrowed several dozen items of equipment from the BBC. One of her first works, and the most widely known, was her 1963 electronic realization of a score by Ron Grainer for the theme tune of the Doctor Who series, one of the first television themes to be created and produced by entirely electronic means.”

SUPER LEGIT.

(Source: hrrhrhghnvjlk)

(Reblogged from mikerugnetta)
cpshoes:

NYC Agrees to Improve  Accessibility of Yellow Taxis
 Congratulations to disability advocates in NYC!
There was a big win for accessibility in the Big Apple today. A precedent setting settlement agreement was reached today with the New York Taxi Cab and Limousine Commission and a number of disability organizations. The settlement requires that at least 50% of taxi cabs in Manhattan by the year 2020.
This agreement has huge implications for people with disabilities who live and visit in NYC, affecting everything from interdependent living to community inclusion to shoe durability.

"In the half decade I worked on disability policy in NYC no issue garnered as much attention as accessible taxis," said fellow Ceep Lawrence Carter-Long, former Executive Director of the Disabilities Network of NYC and recipient of the Frieda Zames award for disability advocacy from NYC Mayor Micheal R. Bloomberg in 2009. "As the Big Apple ushers in a new era with the election of Bill de Blasio as Mayor it appears that the outgoing administration has finally decided to come down on the right side of history. But just barely. 6500 wheelchair accessible taxis in a city the size of New York isn’t perfect but it is most certainly a sign of progress rolling forward. The real test will be in the implementation. Thankfully, history has shown that if the citizens of NYC want something done, they’ll find a way to do it. With the right leadership at the helm great things can come from this agreement and all the work, that has been going on for decades now, that eventually made it possible. I’m cautiously optimistic, hopeful even, that the shoes of disabled NY’ers will last a little longer as a result of decisions like these. After years of unnecessary road blocks and bureaucratic entanglements, the momentum behind this agreement is an extremely good sign."

Image source: Disabilities Network of New York

Hey, that’s me in that archive photo attached to excellent current events…

cpshoes:

NYC Agrees to Improve  Accessibility of Yellow Taxis


Congratulations to disability advocates in NYC!

There was a big win for accessibility in the Big Apple today. A precedent setting settlement agreement was reached today with the New York Taxi Cab and Limousine Commission and a number of disability organizations. The settlement requires that at least 50% of taxi cabs in Manhattan by the year 2020.

This agreement has huge implications for people with disabilities who live and visit in NYC, affecting everything from interdependent living to community inclusion to shoe durability.

"In the half decade I worked on disability policy in NYC no issue garnered as much attention as accessible taxis," said fellow Ceep Lawrence Carter-Long, former Executive Director of the Disabilities Network of NYC and recipient of the Frieda Zames award for disability advocacy from NYC Mayor Micheal R. Bloomberg in 2009. "As the Big Apple ushers in a new era with the election of Bill de Blasio as Mayor it appears that the outgoing administration has finally decided to come down on the right side of history. But just barely. 6500 wheelchair accessible taxis in a city the size of New York isn’t perfect but it is most certainly a sign of progress rolling forward. The real test will be in the implementation. Thankfully, history has shown that if the citizens of NYC want something done, they’ll find a way to do it. With the right leadership at the helm great things can come from this agreement and all the work, that has been going on for decades now, that eventually made it possible. I’m cautiously optimistic, hopeful even, that the shoes of disabled NY’ers will last a little longer as a result of decisions like these. After years of unnecessary road blocks and bureaucratic entanglements, the momentum behind this agreement is an extremely good sign."

Image source: Disabilities Network of New York

Hey, that’s me in that archive photo attached to excellent current events…

(Reblogged from cpshoes)
(Reblogged from kindworld)
Them’s my feet…

cpshoes:

#GuestShoes 
You might think that I am posting these particular shoes to signal the beginning of fall…. but, this picture was actually taken June 23rd. 
The owner writes:
"And, no, my feet don’t realize that it’s summer."
Cerebral palsy can mean having feet that do not realize the rules of seasonal attire. According to visionary designer Alexander McQueen, however,  "It’s a new era in fashion - there are no rules."
Cerebral Palsy - creating fashion renegades through the realities of being out of season. 

Them’s my feet…

cpshoes:

#GuestShoes 

You might think that I am posting these particular shoes to signal the beginning of fall…. but, this picture was actually taken June 23rd. 

The owner writes:

"And, no, my feet don’t realize that it’s summer."

Cerebral palsy can mean having feet that do not realize the rules of seasonal attire. According to visionary designer Alexander McQueen, however,  "It’s a new era in fashion - there are no rules."

Cerebral Palsy - creating fashion renegades through the realities of being out of season. 

(Reblogged from cpshoes)

New Yorkers Aren’t Rude. You Are.

johnskylar:

And I mean that title with the utmost of respect.

I’ve been a denizen of this fair[ly crappy] city my entire life, in one way or another.  I spent some time in LA during college, but don’t worry, I got over it.  The one thing, though, that I’ve consistently heard from around the US is that New York is a rude city.

This is, I feel, based on a fundamental misunderstanding of what this place is.  

Read More

(Reblogged from johnskylar)
(Reblogged from twotabletaylor)

humansofnewyork:

"What do you want to be when you grow up?"
"I don’t want to grow up." 

My awesome friend, Kyrk.

(Reblogged from humansofnewyork)

lemonsweetie:

Let me tell you a thing, about an amazing man named Patrick Stewart

I went to Comicpalooza this weekend and I was full of nervous energy as I was standing in line to ask Sir Patrick Stewart a question at his panel. I first had to thank him for a speech he had given at amnesty international about domestic violence towards women . I had only seen it a few months ago but I was still dealing with my own personal experience with a similar issue, and I didn’t know what to call it. After seeing Patrick talk so personally about it I finally was able to correctly call it abuse, in my case sexual abuse that was going to quickly turn into physical abuse as well. I didn’t feel guilty or disgusting anymore. I finally didn’t feel responsible for the abuse that was put upon me. I was finally able to start my healing process and to put that part of my life behind me.

After thanking him I asked him “Besides acting, what are you most proud of that you have done in you life (that you are willing to share with us)?”. Sir Patrick told us about how he couldn’t protect his mother from abuse in his household growing up and so in her name works with an organization called Refuge for safe houses for women and children to escape from abusive house holds. Sir Patrick Stewart learned only last year that his father had actually been suffering from PTSD after he returned from the military and was never properly treated. In his father’s name he works with an organization called Combat Stress to help those soldiers who are suffering from PTSD.

They were about to move onto the next question when Sir Patrick looked at me and asked me “My Dear, are you okay?” I said yes, and that I was finally able to move on from that part of my life. He then passionately said that it is never the woman’s fault in domestic violence, and how wrong to think that it ever is. That it is in the power of men to stop violence towards women. The moderator then asked “Do you want a hug?”

Sir Patrick didn’t even hesitate, he smiled, hopped off the stage and came over to embrace me in a hug. Which he held me there for a long while. He told me “You never have to go through that again, you’re safe now.” I couldn’t stop thanking him. His embrace was so warm and genuine. It was two people, two strangers, supporting and giving love. And when we pulled away he looked strait in my eyes, like he was promising that. He told me to take care. And I will.

Sir Patrick Stewart is an absolute roll model for men. He is an amazing man and was so kind and full of heart. I want to let everyone know to please find help if you are in a violent or abusive house hold or relationship. There are organizations and people ready to help. I had countless people after the panel thanking me for sharing the story and asking him those questions. Many said they went through similar things. You are not alone.

X

^ Here is the video of my question to Sir Patrick Stewart

Photos by Eugene Lee, Thank you

(Reblogged from lemonsweetie)